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Breed Profile

Dandi Dinmont Terrier

Dandi Dinmont Terrier

  • WEIGHT: 18 to 24 lbs
  • HEIGHT: 8 to 11 inches
  • COLOR(S): Pepper colored: (all shades of gray and silver) or dark yellow (all shades of brown and reddish brown).
  • BREED GROUP: Terrier
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Breed Profile

Dalmatian

BREED GROUP: Non-Sporting
WEIGHT: 40 to 60 lbs
HEIGHT: 19 to 23 inches
COLOR(S): Black or dark brown spots on white background. Spots should be well defined and round while preferably separated.
SIZE:
GROOMING NEEDS:
EXERCISE NEEDS:
GOOD WITH DOGS:
WATCHDOG ABILITY:
Dalmatian Puppies
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DESCRIPTION

The familiar dapper black & white spotted dog of Disney fame, the Dalmatian is a symmetrical, muscular, medium-sized dog with superior endurance. The Dalmatian has the lean, clean lines of the pointer, to which it may be related. They have short, hard, dense coats of pure white with black or liver colored spots randomly splashed over it. Dalmatian dogs are very elegant, alert, strong, active, free of shyness and intelligent in expression. They are capable of great endurance, combined with speed. Dalmatian dogs make excellent companions; they are friendly, outgoing dogs. They will bond very closely with their owners, more so than other breeds and will exhibit separation anxiety when left alone. Dalmatian puppies are born all white and begin to develop their spots by ten to fourteen days.

TEMPERAMENT

Dalmatian puppies and dogs are very active and energetic; they were bred to run under or along-side of horse-drawn carriages. They do not like to just sit around all day with nothing to do. Dalmatian puppies and dogs are playful, happy-go-lucky, extremely sensitive and loyal. The Dalmatian needs human companionship, without which it is likely to become depressed; for this reason they do not make good yard dogs. Dalmatian puppies and dogs have an excellent memory and can remember for years any bad treatment they have withstood. This breed enjoys playing with children, but may be too rambunctious for toddlers. The Dalmatian gets along well with other pets, but some may be aggressive with strange dogs; males often dislike other males. Dalmatian puppies and dogs can be timid without enough socialization. They are quite intelligent, but can be willful. This breed needs firm, consistent obedience training. Dalmatian puppies and dogs are trainable to a high degree of obedience. They can be trained for defense and make good watchdogs. The Dalmatian often has large litter, sometimes up to 15 pups. Some can be aggressive if not properly raised.

GROOMING

Short, fine, dense and close. This breed sheds profusely twice a year. It is a hardy, easy to keep breed, though frequent brushing is needed to cope with constant shedding. Dalmatian puppies and dogs do not have a doggy odor and are said to be clean and even avoids puddles. Bathe only when necessary.

HEALTH

The various health issues that affect this breed include deafness, bladder and kidney stones, skin and food allergies, and hip dysplasia.

EXERCISE

Dalmatian puppies and dogs must have daily frequent exercise. They enjoy participating in family activities and play sessions. Quality time spent with their family is extremely important to this breed. With their high degree of endurance, Dalmatian puppies and dogs makes excellent walking, jogging, and hiking companions. This breed does best with a securely fenced yard they can romp and run in. Dalmatians are not recommended for apartment dwelling unless it is possible for them to receive a walk or run several times a day.

TRAINING

This breed requires intensive and extensive early and lifelong socialization as well as basic obedience. Without training, Dalmatian puppies and dogs have a propensity to be timid or high-strung. They do not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. Training must be done with firmness, fairness, consistency, reward, and patience. Dalmatians excel in obedience competition, agility, and fly-ball.



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